Author Topic: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging  (Read 302077 times)

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Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2205 on: June 28, 2020, 11:18:06 AM »
As the run went on you would have had to expand your search beyond the supermarket - to toy stores, utility/sundry stores, newsstands, even automotive, gas stations I guess, I donít remember the auto supply stores being in existence then as they are today.  Of course us 7-year-olds sometimes look past those places even when they do exist lol.

Offline cmgmd

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2206 on: June 28, 2020, 06:35:37 PM »
Jews who were more favourable towards Russia drank Swee-Touch-Nee.

An interesting choice for parody, given the specialty demographic.
It is quite possible that the writer of the gag fell into this category...
« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 06:37:44 PM by cmgmd »

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2207 on: June 28, 2020, 09:52:22 PM »
Jumping into the 14th Series - the first on the checklist is a repeat of a title from the 2nd series, which we covered already. An odd choice on Topps part to do that. They could have easily picked any of their products to create a brand new parody. Anyone have trivia on why this happened?

Sugarmess Bubble Gum compared to Sugarless Bubble Gum...



Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2208 on: June 29, 2020, 01:03:02 PM »
Jumping into the 14th Series - the first on the checklist is a repeat of a title from the 2nd series, which we covered already. An odd choice on Topps part to do that. They could have easily picked any of their products to create a brand new parody. Anyone have trivia on why this happened?

Sugarmess Bubble Gum compared to Sugarless Bubble Gum...


Iím not sure if a reason for the repeat use of Sugarmess was ever determined, but what strikes me most is the randomness of it.  Why re-use a Topps title if you already had Rotsa Root?  If a title had to be pulled at the last minute, why not just go with one less?  Wouldnít be the first time.

Online RawGoo

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2209 on: June 29, 2020, 01:10:24 PM »
Iím not sure if a reason for the repeat use of Sugarmess was ever determined, but what strikes me most is the randomness of it.  Why re-use a Topps title if you already had Rotsa Root?  If a title had to be pulled at the last minute, why not just go with one less?  Wouldnít be the first time.

And such a boring title! 

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2210 on: June 29, 2020, 03:59:43 PM »
Speaking of Rotsa Root, that's the next one on the checklist, compared to Lotsa Loot...



Offline Bigmuc13

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2211 on: June 29, 2020, 04:41:13 PM »
Speaking of Rotsa Root, that's the next one on the checklist, compared to Lotsa Loot...



Can you imagine the uproar if this one was made today?  Safe to say this one will never, ever be included in a new release!
Still looking for Series 17

Offline cmgmd

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2212 on: June 29, 2020, 05:06:42 PM »
Ah-so: Derogatory.  Used in representations or imitations of Japanese speech, especially to express affirmation, acknowledgement, understanding, or realization.  Earliest use found in 1920s Everybody's Magazine. From the Japanese - shortening of ā sō desu ka?, lit. Ď oh, is that so?í

Offline Bigmuc13

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2213 on: June 29, 2020, 05:51:54 PM »
Ah-so: Derogatory.  Used in representations or imitations of Japanese speech, especially to express affirmation, acknowledgement, understanding, or realization.  Earliest use found in 1920s Everybody's Magazine. From the Japanese - shortening of ā sō desu ka?, lit. Ď oh, is that so?í

Well, I was mostly referring to the broken English of the title. 
Still looking for Series 17

Offline cmgmd

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2214 on: June 29, 2020, 06:48:08 PM »
Well, I was mostly referring to the broken English of the title. 
I know.  Just having some fun...with phonics!  ;)
Japanese has one liquid phoneme /r/, realized usually as an apico-alveolar tap [ɾ] and sometimes as an alveolar lateral approximant [l]. English has two: rhotic /r/ and lateral /l/, with varying phonetic realizations centered on the postalveolar approximant [ɹ] and on the alveolar lateral approximant [l], respectively. Japanese speakers who learn English as a second language later than childhood often have difficulty in hearing and producing the /r/ and /l/ of English accurately.

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2215 on: June 29, 2020, 07:22:04 PM »
Ah-so: Derogatory.
Iím struggling to find a single word or image on this title that isnít derogatory lol.  I guess the combination of the stereotypical put-downs being acceptable during that era, plus the concept of the parody playing entirely to this theme, makes for an all-out barrage.  It almost seems hostile, to look at it now, though Iím sure it wasnít.  Just a product of its time.

Online sco(o)t

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2216 on: June 30, 2020, 03:36:39 AM »
Iím struggling to find a single word or image on this title that isnít derogatory lol.  I guess the combination of the stereotypical put-downs being acceptable during that era, plus the concept of the parody playing entirely to this theme, makes for an all-out barrage.  It almost seems hostile, to look at it now, though Iím sure it wasnít.  Just a product of its time.

At least the artist didnít go full stereotype on the character, for example, wearing a sugegasa. Still, the tag line ďyouíll have a yen for itĒ is pretty good.
aka Scot Leibacher (no trademark)

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2217 on: June 30, 2020, 02:35:28 PM »
Yes, I was thinking the only thing left out was a ďHi-Ya!!!Ē, with a little karate guy kicking a board or something.

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2218 on: July 01, 2020, 04:19:53 AM »
Moldy Bride and Modern Bride magazines...



Offline Baked Bears

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2219 on: July 01, 2020, 09:29:31 AM »
Unlike the other magazine parodies, this one doesn't look so much like a magazine but rather a thin book or even a box.

And what's up with the bride's enormous bare feet?

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2220 on: July 01, 2020, 09:58:57 AM »
Unlike the other magazine parodies, this one doesn't look so much like a magazine but rather a thin book or even a box.

And what's up with the bride's enormous bare feet?

I think certain issues were square-bound. Not sure about the large feet, but the poison ivy she's holding wouldn't make her moldy.
Now if she was a grotesque zombie with dead flesh wearing a wedding dress, that image would make more sense.

Online sco(o)t

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2221 on: July 01, 2020, 12:50:28 PM »
Unlike the other magazine parodies, this one doesn't look so much like a magazine but rather a thin book or even a box.
'''

Those bridal magazines where thick!  Seriously.
aka Scot Leibacher (no trademark)

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2222 on: July 01, 2020, 03:52:00 PM »
Moldy Bride and Modern Bride magazines...


The real product doesnít indicate a date, but strong possibility the parody was done on this specific issue based on the apparent similarities.  As bemoaned previously, a direct match to an actual issue cover has not been the case with most of the magazine titles, so add a star for Moldy Bride for that.  Agree the enlarged feet are bizarre and essentially unexplained.

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2223 on: July 02, 2020, 02:52:37 PM »
Balding and Spalding footballs...


Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2224 on: July 02, 2020, 03:59:02 PM »
As kids we used to refer to bicycle tires as balding when the treads would wear down, and I donít know if the blowout hole and broken laces are meant to suggest a similarly worn-down football, but if the Ďbaldingí only refers to the referees and coaches, thatís kind of weak, gag-wise.  In any case, I would have preferred a parody of a nice bright green or orange Nerf football, which was very popular back then, and more toy-like, which works better for Wackys.

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2225 on: July 04, 2020, 09:07:41 AM »
This one is confusing to me...Rebell Schlockheed Dumbo Jet 746 1/2 compared to a Revell jet model...? The jet on the parody looks like a military craft, so I thought it was the Lockheed jet real product image I found, but it's not a Jumbo Jet 747. That would be a Boeing commercial passenger jet. Can someone help make sense of this?



Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2226 on: July 04, 2020, 10:02:15 AM »
looks like a straight rendition of Jay's rough, without mod. Can only guess at his thought process on it. Perhaps just absurdity, playing on the name of the fairly new high-profile plane


Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2227 on: July 04, 2020, 11:44:39 AM »
This one is confusing to me...Rebell Schlockheed Dumbo Jet 746 1/2 compared to a Revell jet model...? The jet on the parody looks like a military craft, so I thought it was the Lockheed jet real product image I found, but it's not a Jumbo Jet 747. That would be a Boeing commercial passenger jet. Can someone help make sense of this?


This may just be one of those cases where a better match exists, but it doesnít turn up in a Google search because maybe there arenít any hobbyist websites that photo-catalogued the whole product line.

Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2228 on: July 04, 2020, 12:51:52 PM »
some similarities with their  older packaging of the F-84F model


Offline Jean Nutty

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2229 on: July 04, 2020, 01:02:59 PM »
Feel compelled to post the classic gif

           

Online RawGoo

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2230 on: July 04, 2020, 01:07:41 PM »
Feel compelled to post the classic gif

           (Image removed from quote.)

One of the best ever!

Offline mikecho

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2231 on: July 04, 2020, 02:18:32 PM »
looks like a straight rendition of Jay's rough, without mod. Can only guess at his thought process on it. Perhaps just absurdity, playing on the name of the fairly new high-profile plane

(Image removed from quote.)
Patrick, do you think that 747 should be added to the real name on the Spreadsheet?

If so, then go ahead.

Offline freetoes

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2232 on: July 04, 2020, 02:20:39 PM »
Balding was the first Wacky I pulled from a reissue pack, in 1980.  I had to look at the checklist to see if these titles were new or recycled.

Moldy Bride won a footnote place in history by providing the decisive question in a Wacky jeopardy game (the wording on the bride's sash/bouquet tag). The question was so obscure that the losing contestant reportedly just said, "Game over."

Since her face is partly obscured by her veil, the artists seem to have done everything else to make the bride appear unattractive--the cigarette, the huge feet, the mold, etc. And anyone who would pick a bouquet from a patch marked "Danger--Poison Ivy" would be none too swift.

Side note: I always wondered how many people subscribed to this magazine.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 02:23:10 PM by freetoes »

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2233 on: July 05, 2020, 01:04:33 PM »
Messquire and Esquire magazines. I do like how the dot icon above the letter i was changed to a pig



Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2234 on: July 07, 2020, 07:32:27 AM »
OK...another magazine. The Magazine of Fanatical and Sickly Fiction compared to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction...



Offline Baked Bears

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2235 on: July 07, 2020, 10:37:11 AM »
Why would anyone like this?

Just kidding, Patrick!  :]

The tentacle and anthropomorphic moon are nice touches.

Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2236 on: July 07, 2020, 04:00:20 PM »
and there it is, the best looking Wacky of them all  :great:

that August 1975 issue is certainly a fun coincidence with its 'face in a planet' relative to when the Wacky was released, but the consensus timeline for 14th series makes it pretty much impossible to be an inspiration.

speaking of dates, that's an oddity on this one, where the spine has 1974, but the cover has 1998. Whoever put down the letraset date didn't notice what Norm had painted, or maybe thought it would be better if it was 'in the far-future'. The story title also looks made up by Topps, (Jay had author's names) and to me is rather lame.

Probably the closest of all the Wackys to Saunders older work on pulp magazine covers. It stays close to Jay's rough, but it's very much his own look.

I find no F&SF that match the image, but there are two much older ones (1963, 1953) that have similarities


Offline Gurgle

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2237 on: July 07, 2020, 06:32:15 PM »
I remember Jay explaining that on his rough the planet was supposed to be a yellow smiley face, but was lost in translation for the final painting.


and there it is, the best looking Wacky of them all  :great:

that August 1975 issue is certainly a fun coincidence with its 'face in a planet' relative to when the Wacky was released, but the consensus timeline for 14th series makes it pretty much impossible to be an inspiration.

speaking of dates, that's an oddity on this one, where the spine has 1974, but the cover has 1998. Whoever put down the letraset date didn't notice what Norm had painted, or maybe thought it would be better if it was 'in the far-future'. The story title also looks made up by Topps, (Jay had author's names) and to me is rather lame.

Probably the closest of all the Wackys to Saunders older work on pulp magazine covers. It stays close to Jay's rough, but it's very much his own look.

I find no F&SF that match the image, but there are two much older ones (1963, 1953) that have similarities

(Image removed from quote.)(Image removed from quote.)

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2238 on: July 08, 2020, 05:18:45 AM »
and there it is, the best looking Wacky of them all  :great:

that August 1975 issue is certainly a fun coincidence with its 'face in a planet' relative to when the Wacky was released, but the consensus timeline for 14th series makes it pretty much impossible to be an inspiration.

speaking of dates, that's an oddity on this one, where the spine has 1974, but the cover has 1998. Whoever put down the letraset date didn't notice what Norm had painted, or maybe thought it would be better if it was 'in the far-future'. The story title also looks made up by Topps, (Jay had author's names) and to me is rather lame.

Probably the closest of all the Wackys to Saunders older work on pulp magazine covers. It stays close to Jay's rough, but it's very much his own look.

I find no F&SF that match the image, but there are two much older ones (1963, 1953) that have similarities

(Image removed from quote.)(Image removed from quote.)

That 1953 cover is definitely a better match! Norm probably used a lot of covers as inspiration.

Offline Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2239 on: July 10, 2020, 06:38:13 AM »
Ain't compared to Aim toothpaste...