Author Topic: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging  (Read 302046 times)

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Online RawGoo

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2065 on: May 15, 2020, 06:27:13 PM »
Oh my gosh that brings back memories ! Send one my way!!

It'll melt  :P

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2066 on: May 16, 2020, 11:37:06 AM »
Remember Scream Sicle well, always liked it for the vintage packaging design and just being a big fan of all stick ice cream products at that age.  I think I got two or three of them in my original 13th Series haul.  A fairly simple, unspectacular but much appreciated Wacky in my book.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2067 on: May 17, 2020, 05:16:10 AM »
APE compared to A&P. Couldn't find the exact green beans can to match, but I found other A&P canned goods with a similar label design.


« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 10:38:52 AM by Swiski »

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2068 on: May 17, 2020, 07:15:48 AM »
Remember APE well and always liked it - great ape character, although like the fangs on Frankenstein in Playskull, I have to question the shark-like teeth on this ape.  This was around the time Jaws hit the theaters, maybe that’s the reason.

What’s odd and easily overlooked is that this is the only instance I can think of where the creative team decided to parody a supermarket-brand generic as opposed to strictly brand name.  But I think it worked well and has a lot of kitsch appeal because of it.  The vintage A&P logo is way cool.  And kudos on the matching can of corn.  I remember googling for a match  and couldn’t find anything that close.

Online RawGoo

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2069 on: May 17, 2020, 10:12:27 AM »
I'm not sure that I even knew back then that A&P products were store brands.  Now that I'm a grocery shopper myself, I appreciate store brands!  I still have some packaging from Waldbaums and Pathmark and maybe even A&P.

That being said, I like Ape because it's a funny gag and has a great ape, and it really resembles the actual product.

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2070 on: May 17, 2020, 10:24:00 AM »
I'm not sure that I even knew back then that A&P products were store brands.  Now that I'm a grocery shopper myself, I appreciate store brands!  I still have some packaging from Waldbaums and Pathmark and maybe even A&P.

That being said, I like Ape because it's a funny gag and has a great ape, and it really resembles the actual product.

There is one special case worth noting when it comes to A&P.  The well-known “Eight O’Clock Coffee”, sold in bags rather than cans, started out as an A&P product, but eventually gained enough traction to become an independent brand.  Not sure when the transition occurred, but the “Eighty Cups ‘o Coffee” ANS parody was well beyond that point.  Too bad they ditched that iconic red packaging and block lettering for what they’re using today.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2071 on: May 18, 2020, 06:54:28 AM »
Pure Pepper Sneezer Dressing compared to Pfeiffer Caesar Dressing

Real product images for this are rare, but I found the labels from the bottle along with a bad quality screen grab from a YouTube commercial video.

I also included an old photo of Mick Jagger since the guy on the parody reminds me of him.



Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2072 on: May 18, 2020, 03:07:32 PM »
Wow, you have actually gotten to the bottom of this title and fully clarified any remaining mystery - at least there was still some in my head.

I got the Pepper/Pfeiffer part, but didn’t realize the Sneezer part was a take on Caesar flavor.  So the sticker is basically misidentified in the checklist, referred to by flavor rather than brand.  The images confirm that.  This would be like calling Scary Lee from the 8th “Screamberry Cake”.  Interesting.

No strong feelings about this title good or bad, I do like the detail in the bottle and the bubbly dressing.  Reminds me a lot of Motorzola from the 3rd.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2073 on: May 19, 2020, 04:42:56 AM »
The rendering on this bottle is magnificent. Definitely all Norm Saunders!

Online RawGoo

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2074 on: May 19, 2020, 05:48:03 AM »
The rendering on this bottle is magnificent. Definitely all Norm Saunders!

I like the bottle too.  Don't know that I ever saw this one as a kid, think it was one I hoped to find.

Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2075 on: May 19, 2020, 07:26:31 AM »
Not sure I ever knew what this was other than Sneezer.
Great bottle and the Motorzola looking bubbly oil mixture inside.
As always, great recreation of the logo, love the NE merged to replicate the Latin Ć on the bottle.

Offline Yubum

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2076 on: May 19, 2020, 07:38:24 AM »
Being Canadian, there were a lot of Wacky products that my friends and I had no clue about (never heard of Pfeiffer dressings) so only the most humorous parodies would have stuck. Don't remember this sticker (13th series never crossed the border) but I can guarantee Sneezer dressing would have been a hit in my schoolyard!

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2077 on: May 19, 2020, 03:56:02 PM »
Being Canadian, there were a lot of Wacky products that my friends and I had no clue about (never heard of Pfeiffer dressings) so only the most humorous parodies would have stuck. Don't remember this sticker (13th series never crossed the border) but I can guarantee Sneezer dressing would have been a hit in my schoolyard!
That’s really interesting about certain products being unfamiliar in Canada, probably explains why the OPC versions of the early series had differences in titles and fewer titles on checklists - maybe attempts to edit out products not distributed in Canada?  Just speculating, I really have no idea if that’s the case.

In the past there have been discussions here concerning unfamiliar products to collectors in certain parts of the US, based on their area not being part of limited regional product distribution.  I think certain breads, cakes, ground coffee and possibly other beverages were among the products mentioned.

Offline Yubum

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2078 on: May 19, 2020, 06:53:42 PM »
That’s really interesting about certain products being unfamiliar in Canada, probably explains why the OPC versions of the early series had differences in titles and fewer titles on checklists - maybe attempts to edit out products not distributed in Canada?  Just speculating, I really have no idea if that’s the case.

In the past there have been discussions here concerning unfamiliar products to collectors in certain parts of the US, based on their area not being part of limited regional product distribution.  I think certain breads, cakes, ground coffee and possibly other beverages were among the products mentioned.

Titles like Tied, Crust, Kook-Aid and Jail-O were instantly recognizable, but I remember seeing Chock Full O' Nuts and Bolts as a kid and thinking it had to be some sort of parody of what I knew as nuts 'n bolts - the snack mix with pretzels, shreddies,  cheerios, etc.- and being completely confused.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2079 on: May 20, 2020, 04:42:07 AM »
Bug Wally compared to Big Wally. Looking at the real product cans, they should have labeled the smaller size can "Little Wally"



Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2080 on: May 20, 2020, 02:26:15 PM »
Never saw the Wacky back in the day and never heard of the product.  Was just one of those titles on a checklist that made no sense to me at all.  Not bad though, I’m sure I’d appreciate it more if there was some familiarity.

Offline freetoes

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2081 on: May 20, 2020, 07:46:57 PM »
I had the original artwork once. (Jay Lynch restored the broken lettering for me.) When I went to get it framed, the store clerk thought it was an actual product for removing squashed insects.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2082 on: May 21, 2020, 01:47:34 PM »
Bathless Ribbons and Baskin Robbins...



Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2083 on: May 21, 2020, 02:12:52 PM »
Bathless Ribbons and Baskin Robbins...


This was one of two stickers (15th Mare Cigarettes the other) I found in the mid 80’s stuck inside the hinged lid of a small metal box my brother had.  I assume I put them there because by 1975, being the youngest of 4 brothers, I think I alone still had the passion for Wackys.  Although I also came across some other stuck stickers over the years, these were the only two I was able to cleanly and fully unpeel.  They came off curled and with little stickiness left on the backsides, so I placed them on a borderless Reissue card, slid them into a penny sleeve and stored them between baseball cards in an overstuffed box so that the pressure would make them hold, which eventually they did.  This salvage project yielded my only OS stickers from 1970-something until the late 90’s.  I was happy to have them, but of course ever hungry for more.  BTW, it was also very sweet to finally get a fully intact, unstuck example of this sticker, full border and all.

I didn’t pick up right away on the notion that the parody title was a poke at hippies (guess I didn’t understand a bohemian lifestyle back then), but I guess it works.  Love the product, the colors and vintage packaging.  A lot of visual wow factor as opposed to being among the funniest parodies.  In modern times Baskin Robbins and Dunkin Donuts are often seen in tandem under one roof; wonder if that was ever the case back then, seeing both brands parodied in the same series.  I never saw any combined stores back then, it was always one or the other.

Offline Yubum

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2084 on: May 21, 2020, 02:14:56 PM »
Bathless Ribbons? As a parody it's stinkier than that cone-chomping hippie. Never saw that Wacky as a kid, and even if we'd actually had Baskin Robbins ice cream parlors here I'm sure it would have still completely confused me. Where are the ribbons? And what's that green stuff, slime?

Online mikecho

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2085 on: May 21, 2020, 03:46:08 PM »
Bathless Ribbons? As a parody it's stinkier than that cone-chomping hippie. Never saw that Wacky as a kid, and even if we'd actually had Baskin Robbins ice cream parlors here I'm sure it would have still completely confused me. Where are the ribbons? And what's that green stuff, slime?
I can answer one question, at least.

It was originally submitted as Bathless Right-Ons, but Topps wanted it changed to the name it has now. A clear case of executive meddling.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2086 on: May 21, 2020, 03:58:43 PM »
I never got the gag either. I thought maybe Bathless Ribbons were stripes of dirt on the guy's body from not bathing. Is there meaning to the number 30 instead of 31? I thought they could have kept 31 and had a joke like "dirty one flavors"  The artwork is very eye-catching though! The fun pink and brown dot pattern, the vintage logo, the green ice cream.

Regarding the real product, I couldn't find an image of the lid. Was the "31" embossed like that on the actual plastic lids?
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 04:00:58 PM by Swiski »

Online mikecho

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2087 on: May 21, 2020, 04:02:05 PM »
I never got the gag either. I thought maybe Bathless Ribbons were stripes of dirt on the guy's body from not bathing. Is there meaning to the number 30 instead of 31? I thought they could have kept 31 and had a joke like "dirty one flavors"  The artwork is very eye-catching though! The fun pink and brown dot pattern, the vintage logo, the green ice cream.
I can answer that question, too.

30 was based on the old 1960s-1970s saying "Never trust anyone over 30", which was popular in the youth culture at the time.

Offline bigtomi

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2088 on: May 21, 2020, 04:02:33 PM »
Is there meaning to the number 30 instead of 31?
Has to do with the cliche at the time of hippies "not trusting anyone over the age of 30". Google it. We old guys remember those days from the 60s.  :P

Online mikecho

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2089 on: May 21, 2020, 04:03:52 PM »
Has to do with the cliche at the time of hippies "not trusting anyone over the age of 30". Google it. We old guys remember those days from the 60s.  :P
What I said.

Offline MoldRush

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2090 on: May 21, 2020, 06:45:02 PM »
Wow, a lot of history and inside info here!  Can’t see why Bathless Right-Ons would be objectionable, maybe corporate saw that as too direct a shot at hippie culture.

As for the embossed lid question, yes, I think those were used, but mainly for the larger containers where a customer would want a quart or 1/2 gallon of a particular flavor to bring home to the freezer, not so much for the individual cups or sundaes.  I don’t think caps or covers were used much for the smaller items because back then people would usually hang in or outside the store and chow down right then and there.

Offline bigtomi

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2091 on: May 21, 2020, 07:34:20 PM »
What I said.
I didn’t know you were the only one allowed to respond on this thread.

Online mikecho

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2092 on: May 21, 2020, 07:49:22 PM »
I didn’t know you were the only one allowed to respond on this thread.
No, I was referring to the fact that I said the same thing that you said before you even said it.

I said nothing of the kind of thing that you think I said. If you thought otherwise, I'm not to blame.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 08:55:25 PM by mikecho »

Offline Lavirus

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2093 on: May 21, 2020, 08:46:52 PM »
I'm sure the number also has something to do with their slogan - "31 flavors".

My family was a big fan of Baskin Robbins and we thought this was such a weak Wacky at the time. More's the pity.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2094 on: May 22, 2020, 04:25:47 AM »
Thanks for the history on the hippie references, guys! I was too young to pay attention at the time.

Online Swiski

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2095 on: May 22, 2020, 05:39:22 AM »
Icicle compared to Bicycle playing cards. I'd love to see more parodies of vintage playing cards in a future Old School set - Bee, Hoyle, etc.



Online RawGoo

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2096 on: May 22, 2020, 05:53:24 AM »
Icicle compared to Bicycle playing cards. I'd love to see more parodies of vintage playing cards in a future Old School set - Bee, Hoyle, etc.



I've always really liked this one.  Great gag and taglines, and they nailed the packaging.  Polar cards at the top is funny!  And, they spelled Arctic right!

Offline Yubum

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2097 on: May 22, 2020, 07:49:11 AM »
Icicle compared to Bicycle playing cards. I'd love to see more parodies of vintage playing cards in a future Old School set - Bee, Hoyle, etc.

:nono:

Eskimo is no longer politically correct: these shall now be known as, "playing cards for Inuit."


Offline Yubum

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Re: Gag Criticism, Variation, and Packaging
« Reply #2099 on: May 22, 2020, 09:32:58 AM »

 

anything